Kusserow on compliance: OIG report on Medicare payments for clinical diagnostic lab tests

The OIG analyzed claims data for lab tests that CMS paid under Medicare’s Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule, under Medicare Part B. Effective this year, CMS replaced payment rates with new rates for clinical diagnostic laboratory tests. This was the first reform in three decades to Medicare’s payment system for lab tests. Congress mandated that the OIG monitor Medicare payments for lab tests and the implementation and effect of the new payment system for those tests. The OIG concluded the new payment system for lab tests took for this year has resulted in significant changes to the Medicare payment rates for lab tests. The OIG used the data collected to date as a benchmark against which to measure the effects of changes to the payment system when new data from 2018 become available. The OIG report provided the fourth set of annual baseline analyses of the top 25 lab tests. The OIG identified the top 25 tests based on Medicare payments in 2017 and found:

  • In 2017, Medicare paid $7.1 billion for Part B lab tests, at about the same level for last 4-years.
  • The top 25 tests totaled $4.5 billion, 64 percent of the total and about the same rate for prior years.
  • A total of 50,000 labs received payment in 2017 and three labs received $1.1 billion, 15 percent of the total payments.
  • The top 25 tests were similarly concentrated among a few labs: 1 percent of labs received 55 percent of all Medicare payments for the top 25 lab tests in 2017.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Time running out for nursing and long term care providers’ development of mandated compliance programs

Tips to meet the challenge in a timely and cost effectively manner

The OIG issued voluntary Compliance Program Guidance for Nursing Facilities in March 2000, followed by Supplemental Compliance Program guidance in September 2008. However, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) made compliance a mandate and it is a game changer for this sector. The new mandates note as a condition of enrollment in Medicare and Medicaid “a facility shall . . . have in operation a compliance and ethics program. . . .”   HHS was directed to issue regulations “for an effective compliance and ethics program for operating organizations” and CMS has issued those regulations with a deadline for organizations and facilities to meet these requirements by November 28, 2019. At that time, state survey agencies will begin assessing facility compliance for compliance.

Tom Herrmann, J.D., served over 20 years in the OIG Office of Counsel and for the past ten years has been a compliance consultant, specializing in nursing home compliance programs. He noted that many nursing facilities lagged behind in developing effective compliance programs because it was viewed as cost prohibitive. Those that implemented programs following the OIG guidance will have little difficulty in meeting the standards. For those who delayed program development, time is running out. State survey agencies will conduct compliance audits following the CMS State Operation Manual “Guidance to Surveyors for Long Term Care Facilities”.  Survey protocols and guides for State Survey Agencies have also been posted by CMS and can be reviewed by nursing homes in preparation for the reviews.  When building or improving the compliance program, CMS requires an annual review of its compliance and ethics program to assess the resources needed for an effective compliance program that includes mandatory training for all covered persons. For more information regarding advisory services in building effective compliance programs, Tom Herrmann can be reached at therrmann@strategicm.com or via phone at (703) 535-1410.

Kash Chopra, JD, provides compliance staffing for clients. She explained that many nursing homes may not require hiring a fulltime compliance office, however, designating someone on the staff to act as a compliance officer as a secondary duty is not a good idea and seldom works satisfactorily. Invariably, the primary duties drive out time for the compliance responsibilities.  One solution that should be considered is using an expert as a Designated Compliance Officer (DCO) to quickly, efficiently, and inexpensively build and manage the program. The OIG in its compliance program documents specifically advises: “For those companies that have limited resources, the compliance function could be outsourced to an expert in compliance.”  For more on staffing compliance officers, Kash Chopra can be reached at 703-236-1291 or at kchopra@strategicm.com

Daniel Peake of the Compliance Resource Center said that many nursing home clients have found an economical solution to the costs of building and managing their compliance program by outsourcing key elements, such as hotline services, sanction screening, compliance training, code and policy development. These services can take a big bite out of the work of building an effective compliance program at a very small price for most organizations providing nursing or long term care. For more information about the cost and benefits of outsourcing key compliance elements, Daniel Peake can be reached at (dpeake@compliancereource.com (703)-236-9854).

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: GAO calls for strengthening oversight of Managed Care organizations

Medicaid is a major commitment of federal and state budgets, with total estimated expenditures of $596 billion in fiscal year 2017—expenditures that rival the budget of the Department of Defense. States are permitted wide latitude in the design and implementation of their program. The resulting diversity of the program and its size make the program particularly challenging to oversee at the federal level. The Government Accountability Office (GAO), in testimony before Congress, reported last year that they estimated about $37 billion in improper payments that accounted for about 26 percent of government-wide improper payments. The GAO testimony called for increased oversight of Medicaid providers and managed-care plans, and was critical of the Obama administration’s lax auditing of Medicaid insurers as millions joined the rolls through expansion. During the same hearing, the CMS Administrator responded by reporting the structure of expansion with the 90 percent match and an open-ended entitlement is an incentive for the states to spend more and more.

 

Highlights of GAO recommendations to CMS

  1. Add to clearly establish approval criteria and review processes to ensure supplemental payments of around $50 billion a year are identified and accounted for by states when setting future payment rates.
  2. Ensure demonstrations do not increase federal costs and properly conduct evaluations to increase significant savings and better informed policy decisions.
  3. Improve the Transformed Medicaid Statistical Information System to improve program oversight and collect complete and comparable data from all states.
  4. Conduct a fraud risk assessment and implement a risk-based antifraud strategy for Medicaid.
  5. Increased collaboration with the states is needed to help reduce improper payments.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: CMS increases audits to address Medicaid fraud and abuse

In efforts to prevent Medicaid fraud and reduce improper payments, CMS is in the process of implementing eight “new or enhanced” program integrity initiatives and strategies to address reported billions in improper Medicaid payments. These initiatives include target auditing of selected state programs and known vulnerabilities. The stated aim is to promote transparency and accountability. The CMS announcement noted that Medicaid spending has risen more than 26 percent in the three years leading up to 2017, from $456 to $576 billion. A significant part of the increase was as result of states expanding their Medicaid programs under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Most of this increase was covered by the federal government, with its share rising 38 percent, from $263 billion to $363 billion, over the same three-year period. CMS efforts include evaluating the impact of this expansion on program integrity. The announced new initiatives followed a Senate hearing that lambasted CMS, reporting that Medicaid pays out $37 billion a year of improper payments, an increase of 157 percent since 2013.  The new initiatives will be designed to address previously identified activities that harmed Medicaid’s program integrity, and address problems identified by the GAO and OIG and include:

  1. Targeted audits of certain state MCOs. CMS will review financial reports from MCOs in targeted states to ensure they match actual claims experience.
  2. New audits of beneficiary eligibility. States that had OIG reviews of Medicaid beneficiary eligibility will have follow-up determinations reviewed by CMS.
  3. Claims and provider data optimization. CMS will validate the quality and completeness of state-provided data in the Transformed Medicaid Statistical Information System (TMSIS) using data analytics and other techniques to improve data quality and to flag potential problems that require further investigation.
  4. Data analytics pilots. CMS will use analytics and other IT tools on state-provided data to optimize state data to identify areas that need additional investigation.
  5. Provider screening on an opt-in basis. CMS will pilot a plan to screen Medicaid providers on behalf of states, in the belief that centralizing this process will improve efficiency and coordination across Medicare and Medicaid. This, in turn, should reduce state and provider burden, and address one of the biggest sources of error as measured by the Payment Error Rate Measurement (PERM) program.
  6. State-federal data sharing and collaboration. CMS is giving states access to the SSA’s master file of death records to help with managing provider enrollment.
  7. Publicly report state performance. The Medicaid scorecard will indicate how well states perform on certain measures pertaining to their Medicaid programs. This scorecard will include the state’s “integrity performance measures,” such as PERM.
  8. Provider education to reduce improper payments. CMS will bolster education efforts for Medicaid providers to reduce billing errors, including targeting comparative billing reports and provider-facing tools currently in development.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.