Kusserow on Compliance: Internal investigations by any other name

In most organizations, there are many people who may be called upon to respond to a complaint or concern raised by an employee; few of these complaints or concerns, however, might rise to the level of requiring a formal investigation. Emil Moschella, JD is a highly experienced health care compliance consultant who previously served as an FBI executive and also taught at the FBI National Academy. He warns to be careful about calling something an “investigation,” as it is an emotionally charge term that may lead people to infer a lot more about what is occurring than is factually correct. If a person believes that something may result in referral to an enforcement agency, the situation may make them more defensive and cautious when responding to questions.  As such, wherever possible, he advises using neutral terminology to avoid unnecessarily exciting concerns and speculation among employees. There are a lot of other terms that can be used as the definition of “investigation.” It is a detailed and systematic inquiry into something, often through gathering facts and information to solve a problem or resolve an issue. A number of other activities in organizations could meet that general definition, including conducting an audit, evaluation, internal inquiry, or internal review. He has found that characterizing the activity using these “less charged” terms can avoid the potential emotional response of using the term investigation.

Kashish Parikh-Chopra, JD, MBA, CHC, CHPC works with compliance officers to train staff on conducting internal investigations. She notes that many complaints, allegations, and concerns are often very routine in nature that can be resolved within a day or two through normal management procedures or with Human Resources. However, when confronted with a serious or complex matter, it is necessary to have properly trained individuals conduct the investigation in order to avoid aggravating matters and potentially creating additional problems. Professional investigators cannot be expected to be available for a compliance office to conduct an internal investigation, however, certain basic principles should be taught to anyone taking on the role of an investigator in an organization. Those who may become actively involved in internal investigations may include individuals from the compliance office, Human Resources, internal audit, privacy/security officers, legal counsel, etc. They should undergo training by experts to learn how to plan an investigation, conduct proper interviews, organize evidence, prepare written reports, and manage documentation. This can be done by participating in investigator training through webinars, conferences, or having experts provide training on-site.

 

For more information, Kashish Parikh-Chopra can be reached at kchopra@strategicm.com or via telephone at (703) 535-1413.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on compliance: OIG report on Medicare payments for clinical diagnostic lab tests

The OIG analyzed claims data for lab tests that CMS paid under Medicare’s Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule, under Medicare Part B. Effective this year, CMS replaced payment rates with new rates for clinical diagnostic laboratory tests. This was the first reform in three decades to Medicare’s payment system for lab tests. Congress mandated that the OIG monitor Medicare payments for lab tests and the implementation and effect of the new payment system for those tests. The OIG concluded the new payment system for lab tests took for this year has resulted in significant changes to the Medicare payment rates for lab tests. The OIG used the data collected to date as a benchmark against which to measure the effects of changes to the payment system when new data from 2018 become available. The OIG report provided the fourth set of annual baseline analyses of the top 25 lab tests. The OIG identified the top 25 tests based on Medicare payments in 2017 and found:

  • In 2017, Medicare paid $7.1 billion for Part B lab tests, at about the same level for last 4-years.
  • The top 25 tests totaled $4.5 billion, 64 percent of the total and about the same rate for prior years.
  • A total of 50,000 labs received payment in 2017 and three labs received $1.1 billion, 15 percent of the total payments.
  • The top 25 tests were similarly concentrated among a few labs: 1 percent of labs received 55 percent of all Medicare payments for the top 25 lab tests in 2017.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Exit interviews as a compliance communication channel

Tom Herrmann, JD, had served in a senior capacity with the Office of Counsel to the Inspector General (OIG) at HHS. He pointed out that the OIG, in its compliance guidance, calls for the development of effective lines of communication with employees as very important to the successful implementation of a compliance program and the reduction of any potential for fraud, abuse and waste. This include implementation and use of hotlines (including anonymous hotlines), e-mails, written memoranda, newsletters, and other forms of information exchange to maintain these open lines of communication. One significant channel of communication is the use of exit interviews to debrief departing employees prior to their departure. A major factor influencing the advancement of exit interviews in connection with compliance programs has been the rise in the number of “whistleblowers.” Most of these come from people reporting on an organization they had recently left.  As such, there is great value in debriefing those departing the job that includes asking question about any observed violations of law, regulation, Code of Conduct, or policies. Optimally, an exit interview process should be done in time to permit possible remedial actions before they leave employment.  He has found that exit interviews can also be useful in avoiding other costly litigation involving unlawful harassment, discrimination, safety violations, etc.  It is very important to keep a record of the interviews conducted and responses.

Carrie Kusserow has been developing, enhancing and monitoring exit interview programs for over 15 years. She noted that many organizations conduct employee exit interviews (also called exit surveys) to gather data for improving working conditions and retaining employees. This has been common in human resource management for generations and this type of communication can be useful in taking actions to correct deficiencies, reduce turnover, identify potential compliance-related problems, and maintain a productive work environment. However, exit interviews may also be used to alert an organization to company compliance issues, potential whistle-blowers, or quality of care issues. At a minimum, an exit interview should include compliance program oriented questions that relate to compliance education, policies, anonymous reporting procedures, and attitudes towards the compliance program. The following are examples:

  1. How effective was your training on the compliance program, Code of Conduct and policies?
  2. Were you trained on how to report concern and problems confidentially or anonymously?
  3. Did you believe that those reporting compliance issues would be protected from retaliation?
  4. Are you aware of any ethical or compliance issues; and if so did you report them?
  5. How could the company strengthen its message regarding ethics and compliance?
  6. Is everyone in the work force treated fairly?
  7. Do you believe management fully supports the compliance program?
  8. Are you leaving due to any compliance concerns about your job or work environment?
  9. Are you aware of any improper or illegal conduct in the workplace? If so, who and what?
  10. Have you reported compliance issues or concerns that are unaddressed? If so, explain.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.

Kusserow on Compliance: Four physicians charged in $200M prescription fraud scheme

A CEO and four physicians were charged in a superseding indictment in an investigation of a $200 million health care fraud scheme that involved a network of Michigan and Ohio pain clinics, laboratories, and other medical providers. Additional charges included wire fraud conspiracy, money laundering, and distribution of over 4.2 million medically unnecessary dosage units of controlled substances and medically unnecessary injections to Medicare beneficiaries, some of whom were addicted to narcotics. These included oxycodone, hydrocodone and oxymorphone. Some of the opioids were resold on the street.

When a medical review was made of the injection claims, it was found that 100 percent of the claims were not eligible for Medicare reimbursement. In order to conceal the continued billing of these fraudulent claims to Medicare, the defendants created new shell companies and continued to engage in the same billing of fraudulent claims, often changing only the name of the company on the door to the medical practice and/or inventing new suite numbers to conceal the continuation of the fraudulent practices at the same location. Defendants also owned a diagnostic laboratory to enable them to order medically unnecessary urine drug testing from the laboratory. When Medicare conducted a medical review of claims submitted by the laboratory, it determined that 95 percent of the claims were not eligible for Medicare reimbursement and ordered the diagnostic laboratory to repay $6.9 million in improper payments.

Another scheme involved money laundering in connection with a $6.6 million wire transfer and the withdrawal of $500,000 in cash, which was hidden in plastic bags in the closet of the house.  The indictment alleges that transferred proceeds derived from the conspiracy were used to allow the defendants to live an extravagant lifestyle and spend millions of dollars on luxury items—clothing from retailers like Hermes, rare Richard Mille watches, and exotic automobiles such as a Lamborghini and Rolls Royce Ghost. The proceeds were also used to purchase a mansion and other real estate in the Detroit, Michigan area and to sit courtside or in the first row of NBA basketball games, including the NBA Finals.

 

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

Connect with Richard Kusserow on Google+ or LinkedIn.

Subscribe to the Kusserow on Compliance Newsletter

Copyright © 2018 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.