Highlight on Minnesota: Health plans’ red ink worst in a decade

Nonprofit insurers in Minnesota reported an operating loss of $687 million on nearly $25.9 billion in revenue for 2016, according to a trade group for insurers, the Minnesota Council of Health Plans. The financial results were the worst in a decade, with losses in both the state public health insurance programs and the marketplace where individuals purchase coverage for themselves.

Overall, revenue from premiums increased 4 percent over the prior year, while expenses increased 6 percent to $26.6 billion. State public programs accounted for more than half of the overall losses, followed by continued losses in the individual market. According to the report, on average, health insurers paid $763 per second for care. To pay those bills, insurers withdrew nearly $560 million from state-mandated medical reserves. The bulk of the financial losses reported did not result from the employer group and Medicare markets, which remained steady, and where most Minnesotans get health insurance.

In the individual market, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota said it lost $142 million for 2016, compared to a $265 million deficit the previous year. The decline mirrored the drop in enrollment, the insurer noted, rather than an improvement in the business. Over the last 10 years, health insurers returned a profit in seven. The numbers reported by the trade group focused solely on revenue and income from the health insurance business, as investment returns made by insurers were not counted in the numbers. Some saw hope in the overall numbers, however, noting that the market was not in a “death spiral,” as some health law critics have argued, because many insurers in 2016 saw slight improvements from the previous year.

Kusserow on Compliance: GAO reported continued fraud vulnerability under the Affordable Care Act

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) issued a report that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplaces remain “vulnerable to fraud,” after the agency successfully applied for coverage for multiple fake people, who hadn’t filed tax returns for 2014 but were still able to get tax credits to help pay their monthly premiums for 2016 coverage. The GAO engaged in testing by using undercover attempts to obtain health-plan coverage from the federal marketplace and selected state marketplaces for 2015. The tests found the federal marketplace and selected state marketplaces approved each of 10 fictitious application for subsidized health plans. All 10 were approved, even though eight of these 10 fictitious applications failed the initial online identity-checking process.

Four applications used Social Security numbers that were never been issued. Other applicants obtained duplicate enrollment or obtained coverage by claiming that their employer did not provide insurance that met minimum essential coverage. Three of GAO’s applications were approved for Medicaid, although GAO provided identity information that would not have matched Social Security. For two applications, the marketplace or state Medicaid agency directed the fictitious applicants to submit supporting documents, and GAO provided fake information that resulted in the applications were approved. A third marketplace did not seek supporting documentation, and the application was approved by phone. CMS, California, Kentucky, and North Dakota, advised the GAO that they are only inspecting for supporting documentation that has obviously been altered; otherwise documentation submitted would not be questioned for authenticity.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2016 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.