Webinar replay: Personal Health Information: Hospitals, Health Plans, and Human Resources

Event Date: Thursday, October 13, 2016

Headlines screaming about the mishandling of personal health information have become ubiquitous in the media. Employers handling health records are rightly concerned about their liability for the protection of such data. So where should an anxious employer begin?

This free webinar replay provides employers with an overview of their legal obligations, focusing significantly on health care providers, covered entities, and business associates under HIPAA, as well as the handling of health information from health insurance, medical leave, or disability, and covers GINA, the FMLA, and the ADA.

Replay this webinar to get real answers to questions like:

  • What obligations do organizations have to secure protected health information (PHI) under HIPAA?
  • What can HIPAA-covered entities and business associates expect from OCR audits and compliance investigations?
  • What other laws must employers consider when dealing with health information?

Free Webinar! Personal Health Information: Hospitals, Health Plans, and Human Resources

Headlines screaming about the mishandling of personal health information have become ubiquitous in the media. Employers handling health records are rightly concerned about their liability for the protection of such data. So where should an anxious employer begin?

This webinar will provide employers with an overview of their legal obligations, focusing significantly on health care providers, covered entities, and business associates under HIPAA, as well as the handling of health information from health insurance, medical leave, or disability, and will cover GINA, the FMLA, and the ADA.

Join this webinar to get real answers to questions like:

  • What obligations do organizations have to secure protected health information (PHI) under HIPAA?
  • What can HIPAA-covered entities and business associates expect from OCR audits and compliance investigations?
  • What other laws must employers consider when dealing with health information?

REGISTER NOW

Thursday, October 13, 2016
2:00-3:00 p.m. EDT
1:00-2:00 p.m. CDT
12:00-1:00 p.m. MDT
11:00-12:00 p.m. PDT

Registration is open to the first 1,000 approved registrants and requires a complete name, title, organization, and valid business email address.

Are employer wellness programs under attack by the EEOC?

Many employers or their group health insurance plans offer wellness programs to promote healthier lifestyles for their employees. These employer wellness programs (EWPs) often involve medical questionnaires, health risk assessments (HRAs), and weight, cholesterol, glucose and blood pressure screenings. Some employer and group health insurance plans offer financial and other types of incentives to participating employees or to those who achieve certain targeted health outcomes.

Until 2014, it seems to have been clear sailing for employers on the EWP front as long as they complied with certain federal nondiscrimination provisions. In 2014, however, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) starting filing lawsuits against employers alleging that their EWPs were not voluntary as required by Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While the courts have uniformly ruled in favor of the employers in these cases, the EEOC, nevertheless, proceeded to propose new regulations under the ADA and Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) that imposed new standards and ignored an existing ADA “safe harbor” provision for bona fide employer benefit plans. Despite both Congressional concerns and numerous industry comments asking the EEOC to align its new ADA and GINA final rules with the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) (P.L. 104-191) and the HIPAA privacy and security breach notification requirements, with which employers had worked so hard to comply, the final rules made no concessions to these concerns.

This White Paper first examines the federal law applicable to EWPs, the recent court challenges by the EEOC, the new ADA and GINA final rules, and the status of proposed legislation to void the rules. It closes by providing the results of a Q&A session with industry experts and advice on what employers should do to ensure that their EWPs pass muster with the new EEOC rules, both applicable on January 1, 2017.

Read further, “Are employer wellness plans under attack by the EEOC?