Compounding pharmacy enjoined from manufacturing until remedial measures are implemented

Isomeric Pharmacy Solutions LLC (Isomeric) and three executives are permanently enjoined from manufacturing and distributing drugs considered adulterated in violation of the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDC Act) (21 U.S.C. §301 et seq.). The injunction was entered in the Utah district court following a complaint entered by the Department of Justice (DOJ) after finding that Isomeric, a compounding pharmacy, was producing drugs under insanitary conditions.

Isomeric

Isomeric manufactures, labels, and distributes drugs, particularly injectable hormones and corticosteroids, as well as ophthalmic drops. Most of the drugs are directly distributed to physicians. The company initiated three recalls in 2016 involving three types of injectable drugs. In April 2017, Isomeric recalled all lots of non-expired drug products that should have been sterile and were compounded between October 4, 2016 and February 7, 2017.

Complaint

According to the complaint, the FDA found that Isomeric repeatedly found several types of microorganisms in the air and on surfaces that should have been sterile. Products that were manufactured in these areas were prepared in insanitary conditions. The FDA found that Isomeric deviated from current good manufacturing practice requirements, and failed to thoroughly review discrepancies or failures found in batches of drugs.

The injunction was entered through a consent decree as part of a settlement. Isomeric and its chief executive officer, chief sales officer, and chief operating officer will not resume manufacturing, holding, or distributing drugs until proper remedial measures have been taken.

FDA warns Hospira to clear up flaws in injectable manufacturing

The FDA sent a letter warning Hospira Inc., a Pfizer Company, that some of the manufacturer’s drugs are adulterated due to violations of current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations for finished pharmaceuticals. Following an FDA inspection, the agency identified a number of CGMP failures, including a lack of adequate controls, the presence of visible particulates in sterile injectable products, and inadequate procedures to prevent contamination. The FDA noted that the failure to promptly correct the identified violations could result in seizure and injunction.

The FDA inspected Hospira’s McPherson, Kansas, facility from May 16 to June 8, 2016. The inspection revealed violations of the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDC Act) (21 U.S.C. § 351(a)(2)(B)), as well as federal regulations (21 C.F.R. parts 210 and 211). Some of the violations stemmed from inadequate investigation, including multiple instances where Hospira determined that visible particulate in sterile injectable products were pieces of cardboard but closed the investigations without taking further corrective action. The inspection also identified poor aseptic technique due to the use of unsterilized materials in an aseptic manufacturing environment. The FDA also determined that Hospira failed to submit field alert reports to the agency after the manufacturer identified numerous cases of extensive label deterioration.

An announcement by Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Inc. indicates the company’s position that the warning letter should not impact the production of Momenta’s Glatopa™ 20 mg (glatiramer acetate injection) product, which is filled and finished by Pfizer. However, Momenta’s Glatopa 40 mg abbreviated new drug application (ANDA), which is still under FDA review, is dependent on the “satisfactory resolution of the compliance observations at the Pfizer facility used to make the final product.” As a result, Momenta indicated that approval in the first quarter of 2017 is unlikely.