Physician practices get tips for effective communication, training, vetting

Compliance officers often encounter problems ensuring physician compliance within physician practices and face difficulties when communicating with physician practice groups. When addressing physician practice issues, Betty Baber-Kinsey, Physician Practice Compliance Officer, Tenet Healthcare, considers such things as how to get in front of potential issues before they occur, how physicians are employed, how to vet new products or new procedures, and coding and prescribing issues. Baber-Kinsey addressed these various issues at the 2017 Health Care Compliance Association Compliance Institute on March 26, 2017.

Effective communication

A compliance officer dealing with multiple physician practices is likely to face difficulties communicating across in part due to the makeup, size, and locations of the practices, Baber-Kinsey said. One decision that has to be made is whether the message is delivered in person or remotely. Baber-Kinsey suggested four methods of communication across practices. Messages can cascade down from the top executives or the board of directors to management and then staff, can be delivered through videos, or through web-ex sessions. Baber-Kinsey also recommended monthly recurring calls and bi-weekly operations calls. She noted that monthly practice managers meetings are recorded and minutes are taken.

Training

Baber-Kinsey stressed that training was all about the buy-in. She approaches training in three ways: live training, computer courses with a test, and video training. Training topics include conflicts of interest, vendor relationships, the Yates Memo, and the Physician Payments Sunshine Act (Section 6002 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148) codified at Social Security Act Sec.1128G). Baber-Kinsey pointed out that video training works for new hires, for staff annual refresher training, and in specialized or targeted sessions. For annual refresher training she suggested incorporating multiple topics to reach all levels of employees within the practice, including physicians, clinical staff, billers, and coders. She suggested including videos from other sources to let the staff being trained know the issue is universal and does not apply only to them. It is important to include humor, she added.

Vetting new physicians

Baber-Kinsey uses a physician practices onboarding checklist to ensure that physicians are properly vetted. The checklist enables her to “know what they are getting before the [physicians] walk through the door.” The checklist provides who, what, and when or, as she put it, the “What, Documented, Billed.” The vetting process takes about 18 weeks. The first four weeks are involve business development and due diligence including credentialing and information technology (IT) assessments. Weeks 5 – 8 involve credentialing, human resources (HR) and IT operations. Weeks 9 – 12 involve operations, HR, and start of marketing. Weeks 13 – 16 involves operations and completion of credentialing. Baber-Kinsey emphasized that onboarding process is not finished until a billing clearance audit is completed and within goal, which means that the physician’s billing error rate is 5 percent or less.

Alternative lines of business

The latest trend for physicians is providing an alternative line of business, according to Baber-Kinsey.An alternative line of business means any items and/or products that may not fit into traditional lines of service for the primary or specialty care practice,” according to Baber-Kinsey. Examples of alternative lines of business include supplements, cosmetic procedures and services, and oncology infusion. Baber-Kinsey recommends getting in front of the alternative line of business before a physician is hired. Tenet Healthcare has a policy and procedure that addresses new and alternative lines of business.