Continuous improvement in compliance can proceed systematically

Provider organizations should not dread continuous improvement in compliance and can apply several techniques to simple problems to bring about simple solutions. In a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar entitled “Continuous Improvement in Compliance,” presenter Alan Wileman, Corporate Compliance Manager at Shriners Hospitals for Children, discussed applying principles from Lean and Six Sigma to improve function and eliminate waste in company functioning.

Improvement methodologies

Wileman noted that compliance goals evolve, and that the OIG uses subjective terms for compliance matters such as “reasonable,” “appropriate,” and “meaningful.” What is meaningful or reasonable for one compliance area may not be sufficient for another area or at a later date. Overall, lowering risk is the focus of many compliance tasks, but there may be better ways to bring about that desired result.

Improvement methodologies such as Lean, Six Sigma, and project management have been proven to streamline procedures, eliminate waste, and bring value. Lean ideas and practices originally derived from industrial manufacturing, and have one main purpose: eliminating waste. Six Sigma is often grouped with Lean concepts, and focuses on eliminating error waste by removing variation in procedures. According to Six Sigma, there may be multiple ways to do the same thing, but there is always a best way to do so that reduces variation. Project management focuses on clearly defined terms, roles, and goals in order to successfully complete a project—a non-routine operation with a definite beginning, end, and goal.

Waste

According to Wileman, there are several types of waste. Among those discussed included talent, inventory, waiting, defects, and motion. Compliance departments should ensure that a particular task is being completed by the employee whose strengths play to that area. Motion waste comes from requiring employees to move around the work area too much in unnecessary ways, when communication could effectively be conducted in a non-face-to-face manner or when a workplace could be reorganized to provide a better workflow.

Toolkit

Reorganization also applies to employees’ personal workspaces, which should be uncluttered and only contain the necessary, crucial supplies. Wileman suggests adding the “5S” strategy to an operation’s compliance toolkit. The five elements are: sort, set in order, shine, standardize, and sustain. These elements ensure that a workspace is stocked as necessary, arranged to promote efficiency, neat, organized consistently with other spaces, and sustained in this manner. For tasks, the “DMAIC” acronym is made up of the elements define, measure, analyze, improve, and control. Once a problem is clearly defined, it is easier to map out the process, identify the cause of the problem, implement the solution, and maintain the solution over time.

Essential resources for health care providers & attorneys during hurricane season

Hurricane season has arrived and health care providers in affected areas are focusing on providing services to injured individuals and rebuilding damage to facilities, but not necessarily on compliance with Medicare and Medicaid laws and regulations. To assist providers, federal and state agencies are temporarily waiving some regulatory requirements and providing other emergency services. While active hurricane recovery efforts are underway, Health Law Daily will feature links to federal and state resources.

Federal information:

State- and commonwealth-specific information:

How to avoid coding pitfalls for ambulatory services billing

Ambulatory services documentation offers compliance challenges as complex as inpatient services documentation that providers need to be aware of to avoid potential compliance risks while documenting for billing. Ellis Knight, M.D., Senior Vice President/Chief Medical Officer, of the Coker Group, focused on ambulatory coding in an HCCA webinar titled “Clinical Documentation for Compliant Coding—It’s No Longer Just an Inpatient Issue.”

Clinical documentation improvement

Knight noted that coders “speak” a different language than clinicians and therefore clinical documentation improvement (CDI) has been mainly a translational process. Specifically in relation to medical diagnoses, translating what a clinician may write down in the clinical note versus how the coder interprets the clinical note for billing purposes. Historically the focus has been on inpatient documentation, especially documentation to justify diagnostic related group (DRG) assignment and capture of major complications and co-morbidities (MCCs) and complications and co-morbidities (CCs). As a result, the “problem” is that reimbursement occurs with parties arriving at the same diagnosis with different billing codes.

Ambulatory documentation

As such, ambulatory documentation is equally as complex as the inpatient documentation arena, involving thousands of codes. A major complicating factor is that time-frame and volume of patient encounters makes ambulatory CDI a much different work process than inpatient CDI. Knight noted that among the many compliance risks associated with ambulatory CDI, documentation must support: (1) medical necessity of services rendered (CPT codes); (2) specific services and level of care provided to the patient (CPT and HCPCS codes); (3) diagnoses (ICD-10); (4) severity of illness and clinical complexity (HCCs); and (5) quality of care rendered (HEDIS).

For medical necessity, the clinical documentation must justify the ordering of tests, performance of procedures, referrals to specialists or consultants, prescribing of medications and other activities which payers must cover. It must document services and level of services performed, as errors leave practitioners at risk for overbilling the carrier which could result in treble damages under the False Claims Act. Moreover, Knight stressed that it is not enough to just document. HCCs must be documented on an annual basis and addressed, i.e., monitored, evaluated, assessed or treated, in order to be captured. In regards to quality of care, the clinical documentation must include provision of certain quality of care measures, e.g., immunizations, tobacco use, smoking cessation counseling, BMI measurement, obesity counseling, preventive care (colonoscopy, mammography).

AMA provides resources to help physicians with MIPS reporting

As part of its effort to improve Medicare Payment Reform, the American Medical Association (AMA) is providing tools for physicians to better understand and meet the reporting requirements under the new Quality Payment Program from CMS. The AMA has created a “One Patient, One Measure, No Penalty” campaign to help physicians understand the reporting requirements and avoid the 4 percent penalty for not reporting under the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) track. Along with this campaign, the AMA has created an interactive MIPS Action Plan that provides deadlines and a step-by-step plan of how to meet the reporting requirement deadlines.

As part of the “One Patient, One Measure, No Penalty” campaign, the AMA has provided a short video that demonstrates how to fill out CMS forms to accurately report a quality measure on a patient encounter. A step-by-step guide is also provided as a supplement to the video, along with a sample form to review. There are also links to other tools, such as the CMS Quality Measure Search tool, so that all of the resources are available in one easy-to-find location.

The MIPS Action Plan is a ten-step plan that begins with a determination of whether MIPS applies to the physician. The AMA provides a detailed breakdown of some of the determining factors, such as whether a physician is considered a hospital-based physician, in a frequently asked questions supplemental resource. The MIPS Action Plan then proceeds to walk through the process of reporting, including deadlines to start reporting, and submitting 2017 MIPS data.