Court imposes 10-month deadline for pre-market tobacco applications

A federal district court in Maryland has set a deadline of 10 months for tobacco product manufacturers to submit pre-market applications and a one year deadline for FDA approval. The court previously concluded that the FDA violated the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) when it released guidance in 2017 extending the compliance deadline for the “Deeming Rule” which brought new tobacco products under the purview of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. Rather than remanding the issue to the FDA to determine a timeline for compliance or accepting the plaintiffs’ request of a four-month deadline for applications, the court accepted the FDA’s recommendation of a 10-month deadline. The court found that it has the authority to impose such a deadline under the extraordinary circumstances of the case, in which prompt action is necessary to combat the public health crisis caused by the rise in youth e-cigarette use (American Academy of Pediatrics v. FDA, July 12, 2019, Grimm, P.).

FDA tobacco rule compliance extensions

On May 10, 2016, the FDA issued the “Deeming Rule,” bringing approximately 25,000 new tobacco products, including various cigars, e-cigarettes, pipe tobacco products, and hookah within the purview of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. The Deeming Rule went into effect 90 days after its publication (see FDA clears the air, ‘deems’ e-cigarettes, hookah tobacco, cigars worthy of regulation, Health Law Daily, May 10, 2016). In May 2017, the FDA extended the compliance deadline by three months. In August 2017, the FDA extended the timelines to submit tobacco product review applications for deemed tobacco products that were on the market as of August 2016. In May 2019, the district court ruled that the FDA’s August 2017 compliance deadline extension violated the Administrative Procedure Act, as it was done without following notice and comment requirements. The court vacated the August 2017 Guidance and asked the parties to brief the court on potential remedies, given that the application deadlines in the Deeming Rule and May 2017 Guidance had passed.

Remedy

The court concluded that the case presented “extraordinary circumstances” that called for more than simply vacating the guidance and remanding the issue to the FDA (as was requested by manufacturers). It imposed a 10-month deadline for submissions and a one-year deadline for approvals, as suggested by the FDA. The plaintiffs had requested a four-month deadline for submissions, but the court rejected that solution because of the record from the FDA demonstrating that a four-month deadline would prevent them from timely approving or denying applications and could clear the market of e-cigarette products, thus creating a risk that adult smokers would switch from e-cigarettes to combustible tobacco products. The FDA also presented evidence that it plans to accelerate the premarket review requirements for the products that are most attractive to youth, such as flavored products.

The court concluded that without a deadline for filing, manufacturers would be unlikely to move forward with applications, because the record showed a purposeful avoidance by the industry of complying with the premarket requirements despite entreaties from the FDA that it can do so, and it establishes a shockingly low rate of filings.