Doctor, nurse indicted for fraudulent schemes involving unnecessary compounded medications

Separate indictments brought against a nurse practitioner and doctor by the Department of Justice (DOJ) alleged that the two individuals participated in separate but similar schemes to defraud TRICARE. Under the schemes, the nurse practitioner and doctor prescribed medically unnecessary compounded medications to individuals they had not examined, had a compounding pharmacy dispense the medications, and seek reimbursement from TRICARE.

The indictment against the nurse practitioner

According to the indictment, TRICARE reimbursed the compounding pharmacy more than $3.3 million for compounded medications prescribed by the nurse practitioner between February 2013 and October 2016, In addition, the nurse practitioner allegedly received more than $50,000 in kickback payments from a marketer for the compounding pharmacy in return for prescribing the compounded medications and making false statements to the FBI. The nurse practitioner was charged with conspiracy to commit health care fraud and wire fraud; wire fraud; conspiracy to distribute and dispense a controlled substance; distributing and dispensing of a controlled substance; conspiracy to solicit and receive health care kickbacks; soliciting and receiving health care kickbacks; and making false statements.

The indictment against the doctor

The indictment against the doctor stated that TRICARE reimbursed the compounding pharmacy more than $2.3 million for compounded medications prescribed by the doctor between October 2014 and December 2015. In response to an audit conducted by TRICARE, the doctor allegedly submitted falsified patient records to make it appear as though he had examined patients before prescribing the compounding medications. He was charged with conspiracy to commit health care fraud and wire fraud, wire fraud, conspiracy to distribute and dispense a controlled substance, distributing and dispensing a controlled substance, conspiracy to falsify records in a federal investigation and falsification of records in a federal investigation.

Sessions creates opioid fraud detection unit, focuses on 12 districts

Twelve federal districts have been selected to participate in an Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit, created by the Department of Justice (DOJ). The DOJ will fund twelve Assistant United States Attorneys for three year terms to focus solely on investigating and prosecuting fraud related to prescription opioids. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the program’s formation at the Columbus Police Academy in Ohio.

Data analytics program

The unit will consist of a data analytics program, which will allow targeted investigation and prosecution. Sessions stated that the team would use such information as physicians who prescribe opioids at a higher rate than peers, the average age of patients receiving the prescriptions, and pharmacies dispensing large amounts of opioids to focus its investigation.

The federal prosecutors, located in districts across the country, will work with various agencies to investigate and prosecute opioid fraud, including pill mills and unlawful diversion of opioids. Most of the districts are located in the east and Midwest, such as Florida, Michigan, Alabama, Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia.

Atlanta pain clinic feels financial hurt after allegedly bending Medicare rules

Atlanta Medical Clinic (AMC) and its owner agreed to pay $250,000 to settle False Claims Act (FCA) (31 U.S.C. §3729 et seq.) allegations that the clinic billed Medicare for services performed by a suspended physician and for administering drugs that were not approved by the FDA.

Suspended physician

An AMC physician was suspended from the Medicare program in June 2013 for making false statements regarding his criminal history. Despite the suspension, AMC allegedly continued to claim and receive payment for medical services rendered by the physician. Because of the suspension, none of those services were eligible for Medicare reimbursement and, therefore, reimbursement claims related to those services constituted false claims. AMC allegedly circumvented the suspension by submitting claims for services performed by the physician as though they were performed by another physician.

Unapproved drugs

AMC also, allegedly, violated the FCA by seeking and obtaining reimbursement for a Canadian, non-FDA approved knee treatment drug—Orthovisc®. The alleged claims are false because Medicare does not cover the cost of foreign, non-FDA approved treatments.

Fraudulent claims submitted to TRICARE for unnecessary medications ends in guilty pleas

In related cases, a pharmacist and pharmacy marketeer, both of Mississippi, pled guilty to conspiracy to commit health care fraud in a scheme that defrauded TRICARE, according to a July 25, 2017, announcement by the Department of Justice (DOJ). The pharmacist and his co-conspirators received at least $192 million in payments for medically unnecessary medications from TRICARE and private insurance companies. In the case of the pharmacy marketeer, TRICARE made payments of approximately $2.3 million for false and fraudulent claims submitted by the pharmacy. Sentencing hearings are scheduled for October 17, 2017.

The pharmacist’s role

The pharmacist pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud and money laundering for dispensing medically unnecessary compounded medications and causing fraudulent claims to be submitted to TRICARE. Plea documents revealed that the pharmacist admitted that he (1) conspired with others to select compounded medication formulas based on profitability rather than on effectiveness or patient need, and (2) conspired with the pharmacy co-owners to avoid fraud prevention measures, such as collecting copayments, to incentivize patients to receive medically unnecessary medications.

The marketeer’s role

The pharmacy marketeer pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud for his role in the scheme to defraud TRICARE. Plea documents indicated that the marketeer admitted to (1) soliciting physicians and other medical professionals to write prescriptions without seeing patients for medically unnecessary compounded medications dispensed by the pharmacy; and (2) conspiring with others to falsify patient records to make it appear as though medical professionals had seen patients prior to the date prescriptions were written.