Compliance advice offered to providers in the orthotic and prosthetic arena

There are high clinical documentation standards for orthotic and prosthetic (O&P) providers. Non-compliance with these documentation requirements can result in numerous adverse consequences for O&P providers, including: audits; recoupment of payments already received; loss of contracting and provider privileges; civil money penalties; loss of credentialing, certification, or licensure; the risk of getting on the Zone Program Integrity Contractor (ZPIC) radar, and exclusion from participation with any physician that accepts government funding, such as Medicare or Medicaid.

Understanding and applying compliance requirements in the O&P arena was the focus of a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar offered by Tonja Wise, CHC, Corporate Compliance Manager, O&P Compliance Officer, Shriners Hospitals for Children International.

Wise’s presentation began by explaining why the O&P provider needs compliance and how O&P is different from other specialties. She then discussed the O&P provider’s obligations in the areas of documentation, provider notes, coding, and billing. Wise also noted the importance of the prescribing physician, who shares some of the documentation responsibility with the O&P provider. A summary of Wise’s major points of these topics include the following:

  • As a result of recent fraudulent activity and increased payment recoveries, O&P has become the new durable medical equipment (DME) when it comes to audits and scrutiny by the Office of Inspector General (OIG).
  • O&P suppliers that intend to bill Medicare (and Medicaid in most states) must be accredited. The Board of Certification/Accreditation (BOC) and the Association of Boards of Certification (ABC) both offer this service. Going through accreditation is good practice for ensuring that the organization meets the Medicare Supplier Standards and the accreditation standards.
  • Medical documentation must corroborate the O&P provider’s chart and justify the order written and device supplied. Documentation of the orders, delivery, use and care instructions, and safety are very specific.
  • Documentation requirements include a signed HIPAA acknowledgement; consents for treatment; a valid dispensing order prior to delivery; a signed, detailed written order prior to billing; a detailed delivery receipt; complete, comprehensive O&P provider notes; safety checks completed; and proof of patient care and instructions.
  • Provider notes should be complete, comprehensive, and compliant. This means each patient visit should have an independent, detailed note. The initial evaluation and the delivery visits are the most involved and will be the most important to the payor or auditor. These notes must outline all of the information necessary to support medical necessity.
  • It is the responsibility of the certified O&P provider to ensure that the appropriate Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) codes are selected.
  • Know the federal requirements for the warranty period for O&P devices. CMS requires a 90-day warranty for all new devices. State Medicaid warranty periods may differ. The O&P provider does not need a new prescription for repairs if the provider delivered the device, unless major components are being replaced.
  • All bills should be reviewed for accuracy and consistency prior to submission. Confirm that diagnostic codes on all orders are consistent with the claim. Ensure all modifiers are included with the claim and are accurate.
  • Prescribing physicians are responsible for providing orders that meet CMS criteria for all O&P devices, documenting all medical necessity for the device being ordered, providing accurate diagnosis data (O&P providers cannot diagnose), and supplying any medical documentation necessary to support the O&P provider’s claim.

Conclusion

Wise believes that the best protection for an O&P provider is to have a robust compliance program in place to monitor coding, billing, medical necessity, and documentation. To ensure this compliance, she suggests that the O&P provider do the following:

  • Conduct annual compliance education.
  • Utilize access to O&P resources for guidance.
  • Be knowledgeable of federal, state and local requirements.
  • Be educated on payor requirements.
  • Read and understand the local coverage decisions (LCDs) and reference them frequently.
  • Be a self-auditor and audit frequently.
  • Ensure that any regulatory updates or major changes to O&P are communicated throughout the organization.

DME company owner convicted on 18 counts, receives 80-month sentence

The owner of a medical equipment supply company faces 80 months—just under seven years—in prison and was ordered to pay restitution of about $2 million after directing a fraud scheme. The New Orleans-based company, called Psalms 23 DME LLC (Psalms), used patient recruiters to get the names and billing information of local Medicare beneficiaries, and then fraudulently billed Medicare for durable medical equipment (DME) for these patients.

Scheme

The government’s evidence at the trial showed that Psalms billed for equipment from power wheelchairs to back braces, mostly for beneficiaries that did not need, want, or even receive the equipment. Most of the $3.3 million in claims billed were fraudulent, and the company received $2 million in payment on these claims.

The owner was convicted of 18 counts of fraud, conspiracy, and other charges following a five-day trial.

DMEPOS suppliers accept adjusted fee schedule rates

Durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS) suppliers in non-competitive bidding program areas are accepting adjusted payment rates that were phased in beginning in 2016. CMS posted quarterly monitoring data suggesting that the adjusted rates are adequate to cover the costs of furnishing DMEPOS and have had no negative impact on beneficiary access. The fully adjusted billing rates will take effect in non-competitive bidding areas beginning July 1, 2016.

Competitive bidding program

CMS has operated the DMEPOS competitive bidding program (CBP) since January 2011 to improve upon the prior DMEPOS fee schedule, which was based on historic supplier charges from the 1980s and resulted in excessive payments. Medicare saved more than $580 million upon the completion Round 1’s three-year contract period, which lasted from 2011 through 2013. After the first two years of Round 2 and the national mail-order programs, which began in July 2013, it saved approximately $3.6 billion.

Non-CBP areas

Section 1834(a)(1)(F) of the Social Security Act requires CMS to adjust fee schedule amounts for durable medical equipment (DME) on January 1, 2016, in non-CBP areas. Section 1842(s)(3)(B) authorizes adjustments to the fee schedule amount for enteral nutrients, equipment and supplies based on information from CBPs. To combat stakeholder concerns that the adjustment might negatively impact quality and access to items and services, CMS decided to phase in the adjustments to the fee schedule amounts for claims with dates of service January 1, 2016, through June 30, 2016, with each fee schedule amount based on a blend of 50 percent of the fee schedule amount that would have gone into effect on January 1, 2016, if not adjusted based on information from the CBP, and 50 percent of the adjusted fee schedule amount.

Data

Suppliers in non-CBP areas are not required to accept assignment of Medicare claims for items subject to competitive bidding and may instead collect the extra money needed to cover their costs directly from the beneficiary. However, the data for 2016 show that suppliers in non-CBP areas have accepted the new, adjusted rates as payment in full. Overall, there was no change in the rate of assignment for the first four months of 2015 (99.87 percent) compared to the first four months of 2016 (99.88 percent). The data are also broken down by geographic regions, rural versus non-rural classification, and DMEPOS item category. CMS will continue to monitor data for the second quarter of 2016 and after the fully adjusted payment rates are implemented beginning in the third quarter.