FDA fights ‘dishonest actors’ to preserve clinical potential of stem cell research

The FDA is increasing its stem cell therapy enforcement activity to diminish the influence of “unscrupulous actors” while protecting the promise of responsible stem cell therapy innovations. According to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, the agency plans to release a new comprehensive policy framework in the fall of 2017 to properly describe the rules governing the new field of regenerative stem cell research and product development. The framework will provide a more efficient means for stem cell product developers to gain FDA approval.

Enforcement

The announcement of stepped up enforcement activities follows a warning letter issued by the FDA on August 24, 2017 to US Stem Cell Clinic of Sunrise, Florida, due to the manufacturers “significant deviations from current good manufacturing practice requirements” and the seizure, on August 25, 2017, of an unapproved vaccine, which the California Stem Cell Treatment Centers in Rancho Mirage and Beverly Hills, California were using to create an unapproved stem cell product for cancer patients. The warning letter followed an investigation which revealed the clinic failed to develop appropriate procedures to prevent microbiological contamination. The seizure of the vaccine followed an inspection which revealed the vaccine was used to create an intravenous stem cell cancer product with unproven efficacy and risks of serious health problems related to using the virus.

Guidance

In response to the recent enforcement measures, the FDA launched a new working group focused on pursuing similar, “unscrupulous clinics.” The new framework develops a bright line to accommodate what Gottlieb called “good actors working on genuine science.” The FDA plans to set out the policy in a series of guidance documents.