Webinar gives tips on improving next eCQM submissions

Health care compliance professionals who are involved in electronic clinical quality measures (eCQM) submissions should prepare now for their 2017 submissions, according to Catherine Gorman Klug RN, MSN, Director, Quality Service Line, for Nuance Communications. In a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar titled, “eCQM Lessons Learned and How to Prepare for 2017 Submissions,” Klug warned attendees about hidden dangers, including the lack of experience for eCQM vendors, inaccurate data submissions, and the challenges posed by multiple types of electronic health record (EHR) data files generated from more than one system. She also gave recommendations for reducing risk and listed sample questions for the information technology (IT) department.

CMS requires hospitals to report eight of 15 eCQMs, with data reported for the entire year. According to Klug, the agency expects “one file, per patient, per quarter,” that includes all episodes for care and measures associated with the patient. Many hospitals use vendors to assist with the eCQM submissions, but Klug noted that vendors must have an adequate amount of time to respond to required changes before submission, and that although many vendors support a broad number of eCQMs, they may lack adequate depth of coverage. Hospitals should choose vendors who are experienced in the eCQMs they are reporting. Further, there is no way to validate the files submitted. Possible consequences include an annual payment update reduction, failure to receive the EHR incentive payment, or poor quality scores on CMS’ Hospital Compare site.

To reduce risks, hospitals should ask the core measures vendor to validate files before submission to CMS. They should also review file error reports from the vendor and make corrections before the data is submitted. Aggregated file error reports should also be reviewed to ensure that formatting or data elements don’t result in an inaccurate submission. Klug said that accurate coding is absolutely essential. Therefore, hospital IT departments should be prepared to explain how files are validated prior to submission to ensure accuracy, and if not, what the remediation strategy is. Further, compliance professionals should request a file error report, and any other reports to help understand the data being submitted.

‘Fatigued’ providers must concentrate on complying with two-midnight rule

Some providers may be experience two-midnight rule “compliance fatigue” due to the changing rules and current lack of traditional enforcement activity, said presenters at the Health Care Compliance Association webinar, “Two Midnight Rule: Where Are We Now?” The two-midnight rule has been a “moving target” and its evolution has been challenging for providers, with CMS having issued more than 40 items of sub-regulatory guidance over the past 3.5 years. Presenters Lauren Gennett and Isabella Wood of King & Spaulding LLP said, however, that it is important for compliance personnel to emphasize the importance of continued compliance.

Two-midnight rule. The two-midnight rule is codified at 42 C.F.R. Sec. 412.3(d), which provides that an inpatient admission is considered reasonable and necessary under Part A if the admitting physician ordered the inpatient admission based on the expectation that the patient would require at least two midnights of medically necessary hospital services.

If an unforeseen circumstance, such as a beneficiary’s death or transfer, results in a shorter stay than the physician’s expectation of at least two midnights, the patient may be considered to be appropriately treated on an inpatient basis. An inpatient admission for a surgical procedure specified by Medicare as “inpatient only” under 42 C.F.R. Sec. 419.22(n) is also generally appropriate for payment under Medicare Part A, regardless of the expected duration of care.

Rare and unusual circumstances exception. There may be “rare and unusual circumstances” in which an inpatient admission for a service not on the inpatient only list may be reasonable and necessary in the absence of an expectation of a two midnight stay. CMS expanded this exception effective January 1, 2016 (see OPPS payment update a net cut for many, Health Law Daily, November 13, 2015). The exception is determined on a case-by-case basis by the physician responsible for the care of the beneficiary, subject to CMS medical review. Relevant factors include: (1) the severity of the signs and symptoms exhibited by the patient; (2) the medical predictability of something adverse happening to the patient; and (3) the need for diagnostic studies that appropriately are outpatient services.

Wood said that CMS has not provided examples of services that might qualify for the “rare and unusual circumstances” exception. She noted that the exception is challenging for providers, who do not know how rare and unusual the circumstances must be to qualify for the exception. There is, she said, “a lot of wiggle room and uncertainty” for providers.

Inpatient admission orders. Before the two-midnight rule, there was not an express requirement for an inpatient admission order, but now 42 C.F.R. Sec. 412.3(a) requires that the inpatient admission order be in the medical record for the hospital to be paid for inpatient services under Part A. The physician is required to authenticate the order before discharge, which can be difficult for short stays. Gennett said that this requirement is “low hanging fruit for contractor denials.” There is, however, an exception for missing or defective orders that CMS originally included in January 2014 guidance and recently updated in the Medicare Benefit Policy Manual, Pub. 100-02, Ch. 1 (see Change Request 9979, March 10, 2017).

Enforcement. From October 2013 through September 2015 Medicare administrative contractors (MACs) conducted limited “probe & educate” reviews, and quality improvement organizations (QIOs) began conducting reviews in October 2015. QIO review has had its challenges, however, and in 2016 CMS temporarily “paused” QIO patient status reviews (see QIOs back to reviewing Two-Midnight rule claims, Health Law Daily, September 13, 2016). In April 2017 the QIO record selection process changed; QIOs now sample the top 175 providers with a high or increasing number of short stay claims per area with a request for 25 cases, and all other providers previously identified as having “major concerns” in the prior round of review will have a request for 10 cases.

Recovery audit contractors (RACs) may conduct provider-specific patient status reviews for providers that have been referred by the QIO as exhibiting persistent noncompliancewith Medicare payment policies, including consistently failing to adhere to the two midnight rule. The presenters noted that providers should be “extra cautious” in light of the potential for RAC referrals.

The two-midnight rule is also on the HHS Office of Inspector General’s (OIG) radar. In December 2016, the OIG issued a report based on a claims review for fiscal years 2013 and 2014 concluding that hospitals are billing for many inpatient stays that were potentially inappropriate (see Two-midnight Medicare policy succeeding but still lacks full cooperation, Health Law Daily, December 19, 2016). The OIG also stated in its FY 2017 work plan that it intends to review hospitals’ use of inpatient and outpatient stays under the two midnight rule.

12 commandments for the operational efficiency of health IT

Health care IT operational efficiency must balance cost effectiveness with patient safety and care quality, according to a Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) webinar presented by Manuel Lloyd, a health IT (HIT) operational efficiency expert. Lloyd noted that HIT operational efficiency depends on risk management, minimized service disruptions, patient relationships, and the establishment of benchmarks.

Operational efficiency

 Lloyd offered the following “twelve commandments” for operational efficiency and alignment:

1. Identify and focus on the highest value activities.
2. Service multiple customers with varying requirements using only limited resources.
3. Define, measure, and report relevant metrics to help with fact-based decision-making.
4. Improve efficiency by automating standard tasks and applying lean principles to your work.
5. Unite teams and processes by understanding interdependencies and their impact.
6. Influence the organizational culture to support continual improvement activities.
7. Improve communication by encouraging the use of common terminology.
8. Identify alignment opportunities with the business by identifying and understanding the value chain.
9. Save costs by centralizing activities and teams using well-defined fit-for-purpose and fit-for-use processes.
10. Be in control by clearly understanding your process responsibilities and expected outputs.
11. Build trust within the organization by understanding and aligning stakeholder goals, objectives and incentives.
12. Demonstrate business focus by taking a customer-centric approach to services.

Data

Lloyd suggested that providers and compliance professionals keep their focus on data because, he said, Data Rules Everything Around Medical™ (DREAM™). Thus, because operational efficiency is ultimately driven by data, Lloyd explained that capacity management is a crucial component of continued efficiency as data becomes more complex and data storage needs increase. He also recommended that all data incident management be processed through a service desk so that “data about the data” will always be contained in a single location. He also noted, because of the importance of patient expectations, providers need to have effective workaround to minimize disruptions in HIT systems.