Draft guidance seeks to make drug labels clear, concise, more consistent

In an effort to assist applicants in writing the Indications and Usage section of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products, the FDA issued a new draft guidance. The FDA’s intent is to make information in prescription drug labeling easier for health care practitioners to access, read, and use. The goal of the guidance is to help ensure that the labeling is clear, concise, useful, and informative and, to the extent possible, consistent in content and format within and across drug and therapeutic classes (Notice, 83 FR 31759, July 9, 2018).

Indications

The Indications and Usage section should clearly communicate the scope of the approved indication, including the population to which the determination of safety and effectiveness is applicable. The guidance includes information on how and when evidence may support approval of an indication that is broader or narrower in scope than the precise population studied.

The indication should begin “Drug X is indicated” and be followed by the disease, condition, or manifestation of the cease or condition being treated, prevented, mitigated, cured, or diagnosed, and when applicable other information necessary to describe the approved indication. The other information may include selected patient subgroups or disease sub populations for whom the drug is approved, adjunctive or concomitant therapy or therapeutic modalities to use before initiation drug therapy, or specific tests needed to select patients in whom to use the drug.

Limitations of use

Limitations of use should be presented separately from the indication and should only be included when the awareness of such information is important for practitioners to ensure the safe and effective use of the drug. Limitations of Use are appropriate for drugs for which there is reasonable concern or uncertainty about effectiveness or safety in a certain clinical situation, drugs approved without evidence of benefits known to occur with other drugs in the same class, or drugs with dose, duration, or long-term use considerations.

Language

Certain products have statutory or regulatory required or recommended language for the Indications and Usage section. The guidance includes preferred wording and wording to generally avoid. For example, the guidance explains why it is better to use the phrase “reduce the risk” or “reduce incidence of” rather than using “prevent” in the indication. It also discusses when the terms “only” and “also indicated” should be avoided. Finally, product should be identified by the proprietary name or trade name if it has one, and other information such as the dosage form, and route of administration should not be included in the indication.

 

Cosmetic drug companies scarred by misbranding

A district court enjoined two individuals and two New Jersey drug companies from distributing unapproved injectable skin whitening drugs. In addition to preventing Flawless Beauty LLC and RDG Imports LLC from distributing the unapproved and misbranded drugs, the injunction requires the companies to recall and destroy all of the unapproved and misbranded injectable skin whitening drugs. The companies and individuals agreed to settle the case and be bound by a permanent injunction.

Complaint

According to the complaint, in addition to making skin whitening claims, the companies’ skin whitening drug products make other unsubstantiated therapeutic claims. For example, some of the products asserted that the drugs “contribute to good liver function” and “clinically treat degenerative brain & liver diseases including Parkinsons.” The complaint also identified public health risks associated with the companies purportedly sterile injectable skin whitening drugs—nerve or blood vessel damage, blood-borne infection, superficial skin infection, cellulitis, abscess formation, and toxic systemic reactions.

The complaint asserted that the products were misbranded because they contained false or misleading information, including the false implication of FDA approval. Other labeling issues identified in the complaint include improper directions for use and the absence of “Rx” on the label.

Injunction. Until the companies meet specific remedial measures, the injunction requires them to stop importing, receiving, manufacturing, preparing, processing, packing, labeling, holding, and/or distributing unapproved drugs. The companies have 20 days to meet the mandate to recall and destroy the unapproved drugs.

FTC nails opiate withdrawal supplement company for misleading statements

Catlin Enterprises, Inc. (Catlin) is now barred from making scientifically unsubstantiated claims that their opiate withdrawal treatment alleviates withdrawal symptoms and increases the chances of overcoming opiate dependency. A Texas district court ordered the permanent injunction following the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) complaint against Catlin.

Complaint and order

The FTC alleged that Catlin falsely advertised its products Withdrawal Ease and Recovery Ease and participated in deceptive acts throughout the process of labeling, advertising, distribution, and sale of the products. According to Catlin’s statements, Withdrawal Ease significantly alleviates opiate withdrawal symptoms and significantly increases the likelihood of overcoming dependency, while Recovery Ease significantly alleviates post-acute withdrawal symptoms.

The injunction prevent Catalin and its officers, agents, employees, and other people actively participating in the company from engaging in any steps of the process of making and selling any dietary product intended to provide withdrawal assistance or other health benefits and represented as having such benefits unless such statements are not misleading. Any representation of benefits much be based on reliable scientific evidence, obtained from human clinical testing of the product or an equivalent product. The testing must be conducted by qualified researchers and be randomized, double-blind, and placebo controlled.

A $6.6 million judgment was entered and suspended premised upon the accuracy of sworn financial statements. Catalin must provide the FTC with customer information to allow the FTC to “administer consumer redress,” when requested, then destroy this information when instructed to do so by the FTC.

FTC sets enforcement policy for homeopathic drug labeling claims

Efficacy and safety claims made on over the counter (OTC) homeopathic drug labeling must be substantiated by reliable scientific evidence, according to an enforcement policy statement on the marketing of OTC homeopathic drugs released by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The policy statement notes that qualified efficacy and safety claims must clearly indicate: (1) there is no scientific evidence that the product works and (2) the product’s claims are based only on theories of homeopathy from the 1700s that are not accepted by most modern medical experts. The policy statement indicates that the FTC will enforce OTC homeopathic drug labeling no differently than it does any other health products.

Homeopathy

The homeopathic theory is premised on the belief that disease can be treated by small doses of substances, which, in larger doses, produce in healthy individuals, symptoms similar to the disease. However, homeopathic products are often diluted so that the “therapeutic” substance is below a detectable level. Homeopathic theory states the more a substance is diluted, the more potent it becomes. The theory is not accepted by most modern medical experts. As a result, marketing claims for homeopathic remedies have a tendency to be misleading, in violation of federal law.

Enforcement

Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act (FTC Act) (15 U.S.C. § 45(a)(2)), which applies to both advertising and labeling, prohibits unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce, such as the deceptive advertising or labeling of OTC drugs. Due to the significant expansion of the homeopathic industry over the last few decades—growth from a multimillion-dollar market to a more than billion-dollar market—the FTC held a workshop in 2015 to better comprehend the homeopathic marketplace. The workshop was focused on assisting the agency with understanding its legal authority with respect to the advertising and marketing of OTC homeopathic drugs.

Disclosures

The policy statement notes that disclosures regarding the absence of scientific evidence should be prominent and in close proximity to any statement about the product’s efficacy. Depending upon the strength of the efficacy statement, the FTC indicated that the disclosure might need to be incorporated into the efficacy message, itself. Additionally, the policy statement warns marketers of homeopathic drugs not to make statements which undercut those disclosures because the FTC will scrutinize the “net impression” of OTC homeopathic marketing claims when determining whether a marketer has violated the FTC Act.