Improved probe and education program targets specific providers within a particular service

Targeted Probe and Education (TPE) is an improved medical review strategy that will focus on specific providers/suppliers within the service rather than all providers and suppliers billing a particular service, according to a CMS news release. The TPE program began as a pilot in one Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) jurisdiction in June 2016 and was expanded in July 2017 to three additional MAC jurisdictions. Based on the success of the pilot programs, CMS plans to expand the TPE program to all MAC jurisdictions in 2017.

Probe and Educate program

The updated medical review strategy arose from an initial medical review strategy known as Probe and Educate, which combined the review of a sample of claims with education to help reduce errors in the claims submission process, but moves from a broader review to a more targeted one. TPE claim selection differs from previous probe and education programs because the TPE claims selection is provider/supplier specific from the outset rather than a review of all providers for a specific service; thus, eliminating providers who are submitting claims that are compliant with Medicare policy from the review process.

Under the Probe and Educate program, MACs focused on review of inpatient hospital admissions related to the two midnight rule and home health eligibility requirements. MACs reviewed selected claims submitted by acute care inpatient hospital facilities, long term care hospitals, and inpatient psychiatric facilities for admissions that occur between October 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014 (see CMS issues additional guidance for “two midnight” rule for inpatient hospital admissions, Health Law Daily, November 5, 2013). MACs continued to conduct “probe and educate” reviews for inpatient stays shorter than two midnights. Under the probe and educate process outlined in an earlier CMS release, MACs reviewed claims to determine if the inpatient stay of less than two midnights was reasonable and necessary (see CMS extends RAC prohibition of reviews of stays longer than 2 midnights, Health Law Daily, February 3, 2014).

The first round of the Probe & Educate program, MACs reviewed home health agency claims to assess compliance with and to promote provider understanding of Medicare home health eligibility requirements, (see HHA claims will be reviewed to confirm understanding of eligibility requirements, Health Law Daily, November 10, 2015). In round two of the program, MACs began a one-year period of claim reviews and provider education and will start submitting additional documentation requests (ADRs) on or after December 15, 2016 (see ‘Probe and Educate’ program for home health eligibility continues, Health Law Daily, December 20, 2016).

TPE process

Based on data analysis, Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) will review claims (1) for items and services that pose the greatest financial risk to the Medicare Trust Fund or have a high national error rate and (2) of providers/suppliers that have the highest claim error rates or billing practices that vary significantly from their peers. Under the TPE, MACs will review the 20 to 40 claims per provider/supplier, per item or service, and per round, for a total of three rounds of review. After each round of review, the MAC will offer the provider individualized, one-on-one education to address errors within the provider’s/supplier’s claims based on the results of the review.

Removal from the review process

Providers/supplier may be removed from the review process after any of the three rounds of probe review, if they demonstrate low error rates or sufficient improvement in error rates. However, providers/suppliers with moderate and high error rates in the first round of reviews will continue on to a second round of reviews, followed by additional provider specific education and those providers/suppliers that continue to have high error rates in the second round of review and education will continue to the third round. Providers/suppliers that continue to have high error rates after three rounds of TJPE may be referred to CMS for additional action.

Kusserow on Compliance: CMS continued to pay millions of dollars for incarcerated beneficiaries

A couple years ago the OIG issued a report, followed by a public outcry about Medicare paying claims for incarcerated beneficiaries. The simple fact is that those in custody of a governmental entity are not eligible for Medicare. Last year Congress passed a law mandating CMS to establish policies and implement claims audits to ensure that payments are not made for Medicare services rendered to incarcerated beneficiaries and steps to detect and recoup payments made for instances in which an individual’s incarcerated status is not updated on CMS’s data systems. Under the same law, the OIG was mandated to submit a report to Congress within 18 months of passage, and periodically thereafter, on CMS actions to prevent payments made for incarcerated beneficiaries. The OIG issued an audit report on their evaluation of 2015 CMS policies and procedures and their planned revisions to them. They compared this information against requirements prohibiting payment for Medicare services rendered to incarcerated beneficiaries.

OIG findings

  1. CMS’s is not in full compliance with Medicare requirements.
  2. CMS failed to detect and recoup improper payments on behalf of incarcerated beneficiaries because they turned off its post payment claims edit to identify those claims.
  3. Medicare paid 63,949 claims of 11,786 incarcerated beneficiaries ($34,588,984) CY 2013-2014.
  4. CMS has not taken steps to act on the identified potentially improper payments.
  5. Failure to detect occurred in September 2013 when CMS turned off a post payment claims edit that it had created in April 2013.
  6. CMS planned revisions to its policies and procedures to deny Medicare payments for the same period that SSA suspends its benefits does not comply with the legal mandates.

OIG recommendations

CMS did not concur with the first recommendation listed below but did so for the other two.

  1. Develop and implement a system that allows CMS to collect the information necessary to fully comply with Medicare requirements that prohibit payment for Medicare services rendered to incarcerated beneficiaries and, if necessary, seek the appropriate legislation and funding;
  2. Review the $34.6 million in claims to determine which portion, if any, was not claimed in accordance with Medicare requirements and direct the Medicare contractors to recoup any ensuing improper payments; and
  3. Identify improper payments made on behalf of incarcerated beneficiaries after our audit period and ensure that Medicare contractors recoup those payments.

CMS officials stated that CMS is planning to obtain the dates that SSA uses to suspend benefits and plans to deny Medicare payments for incarcerated beneficiaries for the same periods that SSA suspends its own benefits for the same individuals.

Richard P. Kusserow served as DHHS Inspector General for 11 years. He currently is CEO of Strategic Management Services, LLC (SM), a firm that has assisted more than 3,000 organizations and entities with compliance related matters. The SM sister company, CRC, provides a wide range of compliance tools including sanction-screening.

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Copyright © 2016 Strategic Management Services, LLC. Published with permission.