Owner of compounding company at the center of the 2012 meningitis outbreak acquitted of murder

A Boston jury convicted Barry Cadden, the owner and head pharmacist of the New England Compounding Center (NECC), of racketeering and mail fraud in connection with the 2012 nationwide fungal meningitis outbreak but acquitted him of 25 second-degree murder charges. His sentencing is scheduled for June 21, 2017; he faces a statutory maximum sentence of up to 20 years’ imprisonment on each of the mail fraud and racketeering counts.

Outbreak. In September 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) began investigating a multistate outbreak of fungal meningitis and other infections among patients who received contaminated preservative-free methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) steroid injections from NECC. The CDC reported that 753 patients in 20 states were diagnosed with a fungal infection after receiving injections of NECC’s MPA. Of those 753 patients, the CDC reported that 64 patients in nine states died.

Indictment. In December 2014, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts announced a 131-count federal criminal indictment in connection with the outbreak. Cadden and NECC’s supervisory pharmacist, Glenn A. Chin, were charged with 25 acts of second-degree murder in Florida, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Twelve other individuals associated with NECC, including six other pharmacists, the director of operations, the national sales director, an unlicensed pharmacy technician, two of NECC’s owners, and one other individual were charged with additional crimes.

Prosecutors alleged that Cadden directed and authorized the shipping of contaminated MPA nationwide. In addition, he authorized the shipping of drugs before test results confirmed their sterility, failed to notify customers of nonsterile results, and compounded drugs with expired ingredients. NECC also used fictional and celebrity names on fake prescriptions to dispense drugs.