HHS marks Prescription Opioid and Heroin Epidemic Awareness week with $44.5M grant

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will award more than $44.5 million in awards to training programs aimed at increasing the number of mental health providers and substance abuse counselors in the United States.  The funding includes 144 new and continuing grants through the Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training (BHWET) program.

Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training Program

 The BHWET program supports clinical internships and field placement programs for professional and paraprofessional behavioral health disciplines and occupations. The initiative serves children, adolescents, and transitional-age youth at risk for developing or who have a recognized behavioral health disorder by adding to the behavioral health workforce. Recipients of grants under this program are expected to expand the behavioral health workforce by participating in internships and field placements focusing on working with these at-risk individuals. Activities under the grant emphasize prevention and clinical intervention and treatment for those at risk of developing mental and substance abuse disorders and the involvement of families in preventing and treating behavioral health conditions.

Of the $44.5 million grant, more than $7.9 million will support a total of 34 new grantees, and the other $36.6 million will fund the program’s 110 existing grantees.

Prescription Opioid and Heroin Epidemic Awareness Week

President Barack Obama designated the week of September 18 – 23, 2016, Prescription Opioid and Heroin Epidemic Awareness Week. During this time, federal agencies focused on the work being done across government entities and announced new efforts to address the epidemic of prescription opioid and heroin abuse. In his announcement, Obama stated that he continues to “call on the Congress to provide $1.1 billion to expand access to treatment services for opioid use disorder.” The investments would build on the steps already taken to expand overdose prevention strategies and increase access to the overdose reversal drug naloxone.