2018 MA and PDP premium, bid amount, related information released

Important 2018 Medicare Part D prescription drug plan (PDP) and Part C Medicare Advantage (MA) information for MA organizations and PDP sponsors has been announced by CMS. The information includes the average basic premium for a PDP, the Part D national average monthly bid amount, the Part D base beneficiary premium, the income-related monthly adjustment amount (IRMAA) for enrollees in PDPs who have incomes above certain threshold amounts, the Part D regional low-income premium subsidy amounts, the MA regional preferred provider organization (PPO) benchmarks, and the MA employer group waiver plan (EGWP) regional payment rates.

Average basic PDP premium

The average premium for 2018 is based on bids submitted by drug plans for basic drug coverage for the 2018 benefit year and calculated by the independent CMS Office of the Actuary. The average basic premium for a PDP in 2018 is projected to decline to an estimated $33.50 per month. This represents a decrease of approximately $1.20 below the actual average premium of $34.70 in 2017. The decline comes despite the fact that spending for the Part D program continues to increase faster than spending for other parts of Medicare, largely driven by spending on high-cost specialty drugs.

Part D national average monthly bid amount

CMS computes the national average monthly bid amount from the applicable Part D plan bid submissions in order to calculate the base beneficiary premium. The national average monthly bid amount is a weighted average of the standardized bid amounts for each stand-alone PDP and MA prescription drug plan (MA-PD). The calculation does not include bids submitted by Medicare medical saving account plans, MA private fee-for-service plans, specialized MA plans for special needs individuals, Program of All-Inclusive Care of the Elderly (PACE) programs, any “fallback” PDPs, and plans established through reasonable cost reimbursement contracts. The reference month for the 2018 calculation was June 2017. The national average monthly bid amount for 2018 is $57.93.

Part D base beneficiary premium

The base beneficiary premium is equal to the product of the beneficiary premium percentage and the national average monthly bid amount. Part D beneficiary premiums are calculated as the base beneficiary premium adjusted by the following factors: (1) the difference between the plan’s standardized bid amount and the national average monthly bid amount; (2) an increase for any supplemental premium; (3) an increase for any late enrollment penalty; (4) a decrease for MA-PDs that apply MA A/B rebates to buy down the Part D premium; and (5) elimination or decrease with the application of the low-income premium subsidy. The Part D base beneficiary premium for 2018 is $35.02. In practice, actual premiums vary significantly from one Part D plan to another and seldom equal the base beneficiary premium.

Income-related monthly adjustment amount (IRMAA)

If a beneficiary’s “modified adjusted gross income” is greater than the specified threshold amounts ($85,000 in 2018 for a beneficiary filing an individual income tax return or married and filing a separate return, and $170,000 for a beneficiary filing a joint tax return), then the beneficiary is responsible for a larger portion of the total cost of Part D benefit coverage. Therefore, in addition to the normal Part D premium paid to a plan, such beneficiaries must pay an IRMAA to the standard base beneficiary premium of $35.02 for 2018. Beneficiaries do not pay the IRMAA to the Part D plan; instead, IRMAAs are collected by the federal government.

Part D regional low-income premium subsidy amounts

Full low-income subsidy (LIS) individuals are entitled to a premium subsidy equal to 100 percent of the premium subsidy amount. A Part D plan’s premium subsidy amount is the lesser of the plan’s premium for basic coverage or the regional low-income premium subsidy amount (LIPSA). The 2018 regional LIPSAs are available through the CMS website.

MA regional PPO benchmarks

The standardized PPO benchmark for each MA region is a blend of: (1) a statutory component consisting of the weighted average of the county capitation rates across the region for each appropriate level of star rating; and (2) a competitive, or plan-bid, component consisting of the weighted average of all of the standardized A/B bids for regional MA PPO plans in the region. For 2018, the national weights applied to the statutory and plan-bid components are 66.5 percent and 33.5 percent, respectively.

Beginning in 2017, these benchmarks reflect the average bid component of the regional benchmark excluding EGWPs. The statutory and plan-bid components of the MA regional standardized benchmarks for 19 of the 26 MA regions are available from CMS. In the remaining seven MA regions, there are no regional MA plans.

MA regional EGWP payment rates

For detailed descriptions of the payment policy finalized for 2018 MA regional EGWP payment rates see the 2018 Advance Notice and Rate Announcement. The payment rates for Regional EGWPs are in the file Regional Rates and Benchmarks 2018 which can be accessed on the CMS website.

Insurance antitrust exemption reform clears House

The House passed on March 22, 2017, H.R. 372, The Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act of 2017, with a bipartisan vote of 416 to 7. The Act repeals in part the McCarran-Ferguson Act antitrust exemption for insurers, including price fixing, bid rigging, and market allocation, and retains the exemption for certain collaborative activities. A CBO report projected that the Act would have no significant net effect on the premiums that private insurers would charge for health or dental insurance and that any effect on federal revenue would be negligible.

The report noted that health insurance premiums could be lower to the extent that enacting the bill would prevent insurers from engaging in practices currently exempted from antitrust law. On the other hand, insurers could become subject to additional litigation and thus their costs and premiums might increase. The CBO estimated that both of those effects would be small.

The American Hospital Association had expressed concerns about the abuse of market power by large commercial insurers with the Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services previously.

House Republicans narrow aim to specific provisions in health reform battle

House Republicans introduced four bills as part of a new piecemeal strategy to repeal and redefine the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148). The proposed legislation—which will be considered at a February 2, 2017, hearing before the House Energy and Commerce Committee—concerns: (1) special enrollment period (SEP) eligibility verifications; (2) premium rate ratios; (3) grace periods for missed premium payments; and (4) a political promise to continue the ban on preexisting condition exclusions.

SEP

The first bill would require HHS verification of an individual’s eligibility for a SEP before an insurer would be permitted to make coverage effective for that individual. Although HHS has already developed a pilot program for some SEP eligibility verifications, the bill would require HHS to create a verification process, through interim final rulemaking, for plan years beginning on or after January 1, 2018.

Premium variation

The second bill would give insurers more authority to vary the premium rates charged to older enrollees, as compared to younger enrollees, in the individual and small group markets. The bill would permit insurers to raise the current ratio of three-to-one to a ratio of five-to-one, or, to any other ratio established by a state. The greater variation addresses insurer complaints that the three-to-one ratio is not actuarially appropriate.

Grace period

The third bill would reduce the length of the current 90-day grace period afforded to premium tax credit recipients who miss their premium payments. The bill would shorten the grace period to one “provided by law” or one month. Although premium tax credit recipients are, by definition, experiencing financial difficulty, the bill is designed to assuage insurers’ contentions that premium tax credit recipients are using the grace period to skip the last three months of premium payments, catching up only when or if they develop a need for health care. However, HHS noted in the preface of its Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2018 (81 FR 94058) that such grace period “gaming” claims are unsubstantiated.

Preexisting conditions

The fourth bill, which does not promise a change in policy, is a statement of policy. In essence, the bill is a promise, in the event Congress decides to repeal the ACA, that the health reform replacement will include a provision with an absolute ban on preexisting conditions clauses. The bill establishes Congress’ position that it will not allow a return to a health insurance market where coverage decisions are based upon the status of an enrollee’s health. The bill makes a curious exception, however, for genetic conditions which have not already led to a diagnosis.

Highlight on Arizona: Premiums skyrocketing for Arizonans, Republican governor committed to keeping health protections in place

When it comes to premium increases for marketplace plans, Arizona is one of the hardest-hit states. For the 2017 plan year, reports show that premiums across the country will increase by an average of 22 percent. In Arizona, that number is 116 percent.

According to HHS, Arizona had the lowest rates of the states in 2016. This honor came back to bite marketplace consumers, who will be forced to pay around $422 per month for even the lowest cost plans in 2017. That will come as a blow to the wallet, considering the average of $196 for 2016.

Dr. Robert Tenchsel, CEO of the Yuma Regional Medical Center, admitted that this may cause some consumers to choose to opt out of coverage, because paying the penalty will be cheaper than their premium. Selections for coverage are limited, and consumers must either choose between marketplace plans or Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona.

Since the election, Arizona Governor Doug Ducey (R) has drawn attention to the necessity of enacting  new health insurance protections if the new administration follows through with President-elect Trump’s campaign promises to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) (P.L. 111-148). Ducey agreed that the ACA “isn’t working…that it’s badly broken and in need of improvement,” but remains committed to keeping access to affordable care available for his state’s citizens.

Ducey pointed to certain parts of the law that need to be preserved, such as protections for those with pre-existing conditions, prohibitions against lifetime caps, and federal funding for expanded Medicaid programs. Arizona chose to expand Medicaid and accept federal assistance in covering the 400,000 newly eligible. Arizona also restored coverage for single adults living below the federal poverty level, which had been cut years before due to the necessity of finding budget savings. The state received some federal money for this measure, and the rest is funded by assessments on hospitals (which is still in dispute in the state court system).

If the ACA is repealed and the federal funding for Medicaid expansion is revoked, the state will either have to take away health coverage for this part of the population, or find more money in the already stretched state budget. Although during his campaign Ducey stated that the ACA’s Medicaid provisions were an “unacceptable expansion of government,” he said he would veto any attempt by the state legislature to repeal the expanded program now that so many citizens depend on it for coverage.